We will be closed from noon Nov 23 to Nov 27, in observance of Thanksgiving. Please Email or Contact Us Here.

0
Sub-Total: $0.00

No products in the cart.

We will be closed from noon Nov 23 to Nov 27, in observance of Thanksgiving. Please Email or Contact Us Here.

0
Sub-Total: $0.00

No products in the cart.

How Much Does Sod Cost?

How Much Does Sod Cost

The cost for sod depends on a lot of different factors, but in general:

  • $0.30–$0.75 per sq. ft.
  • $135–$340 per pallet that covers 452 sq. ft. (pallet sizes vary)
  • Roughly $2,970–$7,480 per average lawn sized at 10,000 sq. ft. in the U.S.

* Prices depend on the type of sod, if you’re receiving professional installation, who you’re purchasing from, your geographical location and delivery fees.

*The above prices are estimates for sod only and exclude additional services and fees such as delivery or installation.

Learn more details below or request a free quote.

Are you unsure of which type of sod to purchase? Check out our Sod Sales tool below and enter your address to get started with finding the best grass for your needs.
What You’ll Find in This Article
How much does sod cost?

As listed above, the average homeowner usually pays roughly between $3,000–$7,500 for new sod alone. This also depends on the size of the yard. There are a number of people with smaller lawns that may even cost as low as $1,500. However, homeowners should also consider other factors such as the different types of sod.

For example, zoysia and St. Augustine sod may be a little more expensive than centipede grass or other types of sod. The average price per square foot of sod for the same type of grass may also vary on geographical location. An important part of this process is knowing how to choose the right type of sod. Prices between cool season and warm season grass types also differ.

Sod prices can fluctuate depending on who’s actually selling the sod. Be sure to also factor in costs for professional sod installation and delivery fees. If you choose to take the DIY route and install sod yourself, think about the costs for any tools you may use during the installation process such as rentals for a rototiller or sod cutter to remove old sod. We detail out prices for these other factors further below. 

Immediately after sod installation comes caring for the new sod with frequent waterings and proper fertilizers.

How much sod do I need?

So, knowing that you’re likely paying $0.30–$0.75 per sq. ft., the next step is to find out how many square feet are in your yard. If you don’t plan to sod the entire yard, you’ll just need to know how many square feet are in the area you want to sod.

If you don’t know this number off the top of your head, one of the ways to figure this out is to physically go outside and measure the space. An easier option, however, is to use the Sod Solutions Area Calculator Tool

The tool will give you accurate information about how much surface area you’ll need to cover so that you can then determine how much sod you need to purchase.

  • Start by entering your address.
  • Draw an overlay shape for where you plan to install new sod.
  • You can now move forward with this square footage number and request a free quote.

Find more detailed instructions in the video below.

How much does a pallet of sod cover?
  • Slabs (most common in southern parts of the U.S.): Comes in 399, 452 or 503 sq. ft.
  • Mini Hand Rolls (gaining popularity in northern parts of the U.S.): Comes in 400, 450 and 500 sq. ft.
  • Large Rolls (most common in northern parts U.S.): Comes in 500, 600 and 700 sq. ft.

Learn more in How Many Square Feet are on a Pallet of Sod?.

How much does a pallet of sod cost?

The cost for a pallet of sod can vary by grass type, where you’re located or who you’re buying the sod from. On average, a pallet that covers 452 sq. ft. will cost somewhere roughly between $135–$340. 

  • A pallet that covers 399 sq. ft. ≈ $120–$300
  • A pallet that covers 452 sq. ft. ≈ $135–$340
  • A pallet that covers 503 sq. ft. ≈ $150–$377

If you have a 10,000 sq. ft. lawn, you’ll probably pay somewhere between $2,970–$7,480 depending on the grass type, location and who you’re buying the sod from.

How much is a sod delivery fee?

For most companies, sod delivery fees are about $50 on the low end and $400 on the high end. This depends on the amount of sod you purchase and how far the driver has to go to deliver the sod. Your geographical location may be a factor as well. Delivery in Charlotte, NC may not cost the same as delivery in Foley, AL, for example.

How much does professional sod installation cost?

As with other costs, prices for professional sod installation depends on the amount of sod purchased and your geographical location. In general, professional installations cost anywhere between $1.00–$2.00 per square foot.

Professional sod installation includes removing old sod, prepping the soil for the installation of new sod, delivery and the actual labor.

How much do sod cutters and rototillers cost?

If you decide to go the DIY route, sod cutters and rototillers are pretty much never purchased to own. You typically rent them for a certain amount of time from a local hardware store since you’ll more than likely never use them again. Tillers or rototillers are often cheaper than sod cutters. We have an article that thoroughly compares the differences and pros and cons of each here.

A few hardware stores that offer sod cutters and rototillers (also called tillers) are:

Grow It Build It states, “Based on a survey of 9 different rental companies, the average cost to rent a sod cutter for a day is approximately $94. The cost ranges between $70-$115 dollars per day based on the size. This price does not include any delivery fees, which can run around $50-$100 if you can’t transport it yourself.”

“The average cost to rent a tiller or rototiller for a day is approximately $77, with size being the largest factor. The cost ranges between $36-$150 dollars per day based on the size.”

Back to Top ^
How to Choose the Right Type of Sod

There are different things to consider before selecting a type of sod. You don’t want to go after the cheapest option because if it’s not good quality, you may spend a lot of time repairing it or have to replace it at some point. The most beautiful option may be more expensive and require you to spend a lot of time on it. 

Here are a few things to think about:

  • Your geographic location which determines if you get warm or cool season grass
  • If there’s a lot of shade
  • If your lawn has had insect or disease problems before
  • If you have pets or kids who will play outside on the grass a lot
  • The type of soil you have
  • The amount of maintenance that goes into the grass
  • Your budget

Read more about these factors and learn about some of the most common types of grass here.

Cool Season Grass Zone And Warm Season Grass Zone Map United States
Cost of Sod by Type
How much does a pallet of St. Augustine cost?

Since St. Augustine sod typically ranges between $0.40–$0.75 per square foot, a pallet will generally cost:

  • $160–$300 for a 399 sq. ft. pallet
  • $180–$316 for a 452 sq. ft. pallet
  • $200–$377 for a 503 sq. ft. pallet

Prices differ per various St. Augustine cultivars. Some of the more common St. Augustine cultivars are Floratam, Palmetto®, Raleigh, Seville, ProVista or CitraBlue® St. Augustine. Learn more about St. Augustine here and the regular maintenance that goes into it here.

Other articles you may find interesting are Turf Wars: St. Augustine vs. Bermuda Grass and Turf Wars: Zoysia vs. St. Augustine.

Palmetto St Augustine Grass Close Up Blades
Palmetto St. Augustine
How much does a pallet of zoysia sod cost?

Since zoysia sod also typically ranges between $0.40–$0.75 per square foot, a pallet will generally cost:

  • $160–$300 for a 399 sq. ft. pallet
  • $180–$316 for a 452 sq. ft. pallet
  • $200–$377 for a 503 sq. ft. pallet

Prices differ per various zoysia grass cultivars. Some of the more common zoysia cultivars are EMPIRE®, Innovation®, Geo® Zoysia, Meyer, Palisades, Zeon, Zorro and El Toro. Learn more about zoysia grass here and the regular maintenance that goes into it here.

Other articles you may find interesting are Turf Wars: Zoysia vs. St. Augustine and Turf Wars: Zoysia vs. Bermuda Grass.

Close Up Angle Of Innovation Zoysia Grass
Innovation Zoysia
How much does a pallet of bermuda grass cost?

Bermuda grass usually ranges between $0.35–$0.65 per square foot, so a pallet generally costs:

  • $140–$260 for a 399 sq. ft. pallet
  • $158–$294 for a 452 sq. ft. pallet
  • $176–$326 for a 503 sq. ft. pallet

Prices differ per various bermuda grass cultivars. Some of the more common bermuda cultivars are Celebration®, Latitude 36®, NorthBridge®, Tifway 419, TifTuf, Tahoma 31 and Bimini. Learn more about bermuda grass here and the regular maintenance that goes into it here.

Other articles you may find interesting are Turf Wars: Zoysia vs. Bermuda Grass and Turf Wars: St. Augustine vs. Bermuda Grass.

Celebration Bermuda Grass Dew Top Angle View
Celebration Bermudagrass
How much does a pallet of centipede grass cost?

Centipede grass usually ranges between $0.30–$0.60 per square foot, so a pallet generally costs:

  • $120–$240 for a 399 sq. ft. pallet
  • $136–$271 for a 452 sq. ft. pallet
  • $151–$302 for a 503 sq. ft. pallet

Prices will differ between the different centipede cultivars. Some of the more common centipede cultivars are Common Centipede, Santee® Centipede and TifBlair Centipede.

Learn more about centipede grass here and the regular maintenance that goes into it here.

Santee Centipede Grass Gulf Coast
Santee Centipede
How much does a pallet of bluegrass cost?

Bluegrass, a cool season grass found in more northern areas of the U.S., usually ranges between $0.40–$0.65 per square foot, so a pallet generally costs:

  • $160–$260 for a 399 sq. ft. pallet
  • $180–$293 for a 452 sq. ft. pallet
  • $201–$327 for a 503 sq. ft. pallet

Prices will differ between the different bluegrass cultivars. One of the most common bluegrass cultivar is Bella® Bluegrass.

Check out the regular maintenance that goes into bluegrass here.

Bluegrass Lawn Close Up
Bella Bluegrass
How much does a pallet of fescue sod cost?

Fescue, another cool season grass, usually ranges between $0.40–$0.65 per square foot, so a pallet generally costs:

  • $160–$260 for a 399 sq. ft. pallet
  • $180–$293 for a 452 sq. ft. pallet
  • $201–$327 for a 503 sq. ft. pallet

Prices will differ between the different fescue cultivars.

Check out the regular maintenance that goes into fescue here.

Tall Fescue
Request a Free Quote

If you’re interested in a certain variety of sod or want to compare pricing, request a free quote below.

Back to Top ^
Where to Buy Sod

Finding a quality provider for sod can be daunting at times. Many of us wonder “who sells the best sod?”, or “who sells the cheapest sod?”. Oftentimes, people purchase sod through local distributors, landscapers or even big-box retailers. 

At Sod Solutions, we work with sod producers throughout the country that we regularly visit and monitor for overall sod quality including weed, insect and disease pressure.

Click “Buy Sod Near Me” to locate sod for sale around the area you’re located or launch our Sod Sales Tool to get started with entering the amount of desired sod and selecting a type of grass.

Natural vs. Artificial Lawns

Even though it may seem like artificial lawns are less maintenance than natural lawns, that isn’t always the case. Homeowners still have to regularly care for their synthetic lawns to keep the blades in top condition. 

Regular maintenance includes vacuuming, raking, brushing and treatment against bacteria. Artificial lawns also wear out over time while natural sod doesn’t if cared for properly. Most importantly, natural lawns are much more environmentally-friendly. We have a separate article that directly compares the two here.

When is the Best Time to Lay Sod?

Now that you’ve decided to move forward with laying sod, the next step is to find out when the best time of year is. Believe it or not, the most ideal time for this is either early or mid-fall. Spring is probably the second best time of year to complete this landscaping project. This depends on where you live. You can also successfully install sod any time of the year. Find a few tips for laying sod during the different seasons here.

DIY vs. Professional Sod Installation

Before you make a decision about professional vs. DIY installation, it’s important to know what all goes into laying sod yourself. Even if you use a professional to install sod, it’s still good to know how to install it yourself so that you know what’s going on during the process. 

Pros of DIY Installation:

  • Less money is spent on professionals
  • You’re laying the sod yourself in the exact way you want it laid
  • With a few friends or family members, the process can go by faster and easier.

Cons of DIY Installation:

  • Takes up more of your time
  • The physical labor involved
  • Needing to have the necessary tools to install properly

Pros of Professional Installation:

  • You’re not having to spend time installing the sod
  • You also don’t have to do the physical labor behind it
  • They’re professionals so they’ll probably install sod the right way
  • They have all the necessary equipment and tools to get the job done

Cons of Professional Installation:

  • Cost
What sort of sod installation tools do I need to install sod myself?
  • Soil analysis kit
  • A non-selective herbicide
  • Sod cutters or a rototiller
  • Topsoil
  • A rake for leveling
  • Sprinkler
  • Wheelbarrow or wagon
  • Box-cutters or a garden knife
  • The Lawnifi New Lawn Starter Box
  • A landscape edger
  • A sod roller

Find a full article that lists details about these products and their uses here.

How do I lay sod?

If you’re thinking of laying sod yourself, it’s important to do it properly. You’re investing a lot in a living product. Nevertheless, installation doesn’t have to be rocket science. Learn more in our sod installation guide.

How do I care for new sod?

Once the sod is installed, you want to be immediately ready to begin taking care of it the day of installation. Use our new sod care schedule here.

Back to Top ^
What’s Next?

We wish you great success on your new lawn! If you’re still conducting research OR you’re still thinking about what kind of sod you want, check out the two articles below and don’t forget to subscribe to Sod University, our free educational newsletter we send out on lawn and garden.

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Recommended Products
Related Articles
Scroll to Top